Biographical information relating to the collections of personal papers, correspondence and Australian literary manuscripts


Abbott, John Henry Macartney

(1874-1953)
Attended the University of Sydney. He was working as a jackaroo on a Hunter Valley property in 1897 when his work was first published in the Bulletin.

Abbott served until invalided in the Boer War from January to October 1900. This experience inspired his first novel, Tommy Cornstalk: being some account of the less notable features of the South African war from the point of view of the Australian ranks (1902). Abbott wrote for many newspapers and journals, including the Bulletin and the Lone Hand. A large proportion of his work drew inspiration from New South Wales history.

Reference: Australian dictionary of biography. Melbourne : Melbourne University Press; London ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1966-<2000>. Volume 7, pp.1-2.



Australian English Association

Established: 1923 Sydney, New South Wales
Ceased: 1944

The association "aimed ... to foster the recognition, study and teaching of English language and literature" (Oxford Companion to Australian Literature). In 1944 its name changed to the English Association (Sydney Branch). Since 1949 it has had the extra aim of promoting the study of Australian literature, but many of its early public lectures and meetings did in fact focus on Australian literature and writers. These addresses and essays were published in the Union Recorder and offprints as a series of pamphlets. The Association has also sponsored the journals Southerly and Sydney Studies in English.

Reference: Name record, Australian English Association. AustLit: Australian Literature Gateway (www.austlit.edu.au), 2002- [Retrieved 16/9/2004]



Berckelman, Colin

Colin Berckelman was a bibliophile and also wrote under the pseudonym Eugene FIELD (not to be confused with the English novelist Eugene Field, 1850-95).

The Berckelman manuscript collection was purchased by the Library in 1966/67, following Berckelman's death in Sydney, NSW on 22 April, 1965.



Book Collectors' Society of Australia

The Society had its beginnings at the regular Saturday afternoon gathering of book collectors at Gilmour's Bond Street Bookshop. In 1944 the group formalised its existence and became the Book Collectors' Society of Australia, appointed officer bearers and adopted a constitution. Founding members of the Society included Walter W. Stone, Fred Malcolm, Stan Larnach and Colin Berckelman.

Reference: Biblionews, Vol.2 No.4 April 1949: 8-10.



Bradfield, John Job Crew

(1867-1943)
Graduated B.E. from the University of Sydney in 1886; awarded the University Gold Medal in 1889. Maintained involvement in the academic environment and pursued civil engineering interests throughout his life.

Bradfield contributed to a great many engineering projects including the Cataract and Burrinjuck dams, a transit network plan for suburban Sydney, the Story Bridge in Brisbane. Perhaps most famously he is associated with the Sydney Harbour Bridge which linked Sydney and North Sydney.

Reference: Australian dictionary of biography. Melbourne : Melbourne University Press; London ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1966-<2000>. Volume 7 pp.381-384.



Brennan, Christopher

(1870-1932) Poet.
Attended the University of Sydney (classics and philosophy), graduating in 1892. Travelled on scholarship to the University of Berlin to study philosophy. French symbolist writers, particularly Mallarme, distracted him from completing his studies. Returned to Sydney in 1894 to a position in the Public Library. Appointed University of Sydney lecturer in modern literature in 1909 and associate professor in German and comparative literature in 1920.

Quote from: EAD http://setis.library.usyd.edu.au/pubotbin/ead-browse?id=MS0004 [Retrieved 5/11/2004]



Brereton, John Le Gay

(1871-1933)
Long association with the University of Sydney, as student, University Librarian, 1902-1921 and Challis Professor of English Literature, 1921-1933.

Quote from: EAD http://setis.library.usyd.edu.au/pubotbin/ead-browse?id=MS0005 [Retrieved 5/11/2004]



Brisson, Victor / Bissell, Harvey

Collection of logbooks of voyages made in the South Pacific, the Americas, Australia, etc., from 21 October 1928 to 4 July 1936.

The voyages were undertaken by the Bissell Family of Pasadena headed by Harvey Bissell in the boats "Wanderlust", "Ariadne", and "Bissy Girl". The vessels were captained by Victor Brisson who compiled the logs.



Bryan, Harrison

b. 1923
Harrison Bryan has had a distinguished career in librarianship. He was the University Librarian at both Queensland (1948-1962) and Sydney (1963-1980) Universities. He was also the Director-General of the National Library of Australia between 1980 and 1985.

Bryan was an active participant in professional organisations such as the Library Association of Australia and the Australian Advisory Council on Bibliographical Services.

Reference: An enthusiasm for libraries: Essays in honour of Harrison Bryan. Edited by Jean P. Whyte and Neil A. Radford. Melbourne: Ancora Press, 1988.



Candish papers

Sydney Candish resided in Ultimo and Camperdown during 1880-1890s.



Clarke, Reverend W.B.

(1798-1878)
Reverend William Branwhite Clarke immigrated to Sydney in 1839. He undertook geological surveys of potential gold-producing districts for the New South Wales Government and produced numerous papers and reports. He claimed to be the first to discover gold, in opposition to the claims of Edward Hargreaves, Strzelecki and Sir Roderick Murchison.

A selection of Clarke's tools and scientific instruments are held by the Macleay Museum.

References: Moyal, Ann The web of science: the scientific correspondence of the Rev. W.B. Clarke, Australia's pioneer geologist. Melbourne: Australian Scholarly Publishing, 2003.
"A revered geologist" Sydney University Museums Newsletter, Issue 5, February 2005: 3.



Close, Robert Shaw

(1903-1995)
The Australian publication of Robert Close's novel Love Me Sailor about a nymphomaniac aboard a windjammer resulted in an obscene libel charge for him and his publisher. He appealed the initial conviction and was freed from gaol but fined 150 pounds sterling. Love Me Sailor remained banned. He felt Australia too provincial and left in 1950 to live in France. He returned to Australia in 1975 but after two years he moved to Marjorca. During his life he wrote many short stories, eight novels and an autobiography.

References: "Writer rocked boat" by P. Knightley, The Australian, 21 July, 1995 p.21;
"Salt of the Earth" by S. Yates, Daily Telegraph 8 April, 2002 p.62



Corlette, Hubert Christian

(1869-1956)
Major H.C. Corlette had a distinguished architectural career. Awarded an Order of the British Empire and appointed an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects. He was a partner with Sir Charles Nicholson in the firm of Nicholson & Corlette.

Reference: 'Obituary' The Builder April 27, 1956 p.392



Cosme Colony

Relates to the New Australia and Cosme Colonies, socialist colonies founded in Paraguay in 1893 and 1894 by William Lane and others.



Cross, Zora Bernice May

(1890-1964)
Zora Cross trained as a teacher at the Teacher's College, Sydney. She turned from teaching to acting, to freelance journalism and writing. She wrote sensuous poetry about love, often inspired by her de facto partner David McKee Wright. Her novels also concerned romance, for example, Daughters of the Seven Mile: The love story of an Australian woman (1924).

References: Australian dictionary of biography. Melbourne : Melbourne University Press; London; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1966-<2000>. Volume 8 pp.158;
Miller, Edmund Morris Australian literature : a bibliography to 1938, extended to 1950. Sydney : Angus and Robertson, [1956], p.130



Darroch, Sandra Jobson

Also writes as Jobson Darroch, Sandra
Born: 5 Apr 1942 Roseville, New South Wales

Sandra Jobson holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Sydney. She has contributed to numerous Australian newspapers and magazines including articles for the Sydney Morning Herald and Australian Consolidated Press in the 1970s and 1980s, and has written in the genres of Australian studies, biography, non-fiction for children, journalism and literary criticism. As Sandra Jobson Darroch she wrote Ottoline: The Life of Lady Ottoline Morrell (NY: Coward McGann & Geoghegan, 1975, and London: Chatto & Windus, 1976). She is active in the D.H. Lawrence Society of Australia and has been the Executive Director of Cyber Sydney.

Quote from: Name record, Jobson, Sandra. AustLit: Australian Literature Gateway (www.austlit.edu.au), 2002- [Retrieved 23/9/2004]



Deamer, Dulcie

(a.k.a. Deamer, Mary Elizabeth Kathleen Dulcie; Goldie, Dulcie)

(1890-1972)
Dulcie Deamer was born at Christchurch, New Zealand, and was educated at home. Appearing on stage at an early age, she took elocution and ballet lessons as further stage-training. In 1906 she won a Lone Hand short story competition and the next year joined a touring theatrical company. In 1907 she married Albert Goldie, a member of the company, before embarking on a tour of the far east.

Returning to Sydney in 1908 she pursued a career as a writer, actor and bohemian. In the next decade she bore six children and travelled overseas frequently, ultimately leaving the children in the care of her mother who had moved to Sydney.

After leaving her husband in 1922, she lived at Kings Cross and worked as a freelance journalist. A well-known figure in Kings Cross, she was crowned 'Queen of Bohemia' in 1925. In the 1930s she wrote several well-reviewed plays. By this time she had written several 'pot-boiler' novels that were syndicated in Randolph Hearst's newspapers in the United States of America. She added to this work with two volumes of mystical poetry, the last published in 1948.

Deamer began to write her autobiography in the 1960s, but failed to find a publisher. After spending several years in the Little Sisters of the Poor home at Randwick, she died in 1972. Her autobiography was edited by Peter Kirkpatrick and published in 1998.

Quote from: Name record, Deamer, Dulcie. AustLit: Australian Literature Gateway (www.austlit.edu.au), 2002- [Retrieved 23/9/2004]



Dulhunty, Roma

(1911-1991)
Roma Dulhunty was an Australian author and explorer. With her husband, John Dulhunty, a geologist at the University of Sydney, she published a number of books on the Lake Eyre region.



Early Imprints Project

The aim of the Early Imprints Project was to compile a list of all books printed before 1801 held in Australian and New Zealand libraries, including private collections.

Some of the cards created during this project have been retained and are held here at the University of Sydney Rare Books Library.

References: Brissenden, Alan "The Early Imprints Project in South Australia" Australian Library Journal, 30(2), May 1981: 43-46;
Morrison, Ian "The Australia's Book Heritage Resources Project" Bibliographical Society of Australia and New Zealand Bulletin 17(3), 1993: 113-124.



General Motors Hour

(1952-1955)
The General Motors Hour was broadcast on the Macquarie network. It adaptated film and stage plays for radio and featured both American and Australian stars.

References: Australian Radio Series 1930s to 1970s: A guide to ScreenSound Australia's holdings. ACT: National Film and Sound Archive, 1998. http://www.screensound.gov.au/pdf/collectionguide_australianradioseries1930-1970.pdf [viewed 19/11/04];
Kent, Jacqueline Out of the bakelite box. Australia: Angus & Robertson, 1983.



Gilmore, Dame Mary Jean

(1865-1962) Writer.
Supported the New Australia movement and lived with the Cosme community in Paraguay for almost three years. Politically active, she was generous in her support of causes, which included at one time the financial support of an ailing publication. Her literary topics ranged across natural, historical, religious, indigenous and political themes. Gilmore's fiction about pioneering Australia and her poetry concerning war fostered public respect and furthered her success.

Reference: Australian dictionary of biography. Melbourne : Melbourne University Press; London ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1966-<2000>. Volume 9, pp.14-16.



Gollan, Ross Francis

(1902-1961) Journalist.
Attended University of Sydney (B.A. 1923; M.A. 1925), edited Hermes. Joined the Sydney Morning Herald in 1923; spent 12 years as a Newcastle reporter covering coal industry unrest. Moved to Canberra to cover federal parliament and became quite influential, especially during the short term leadership of Prime Minister Arthur Faddan.

Reference: Australian dictionary of biography. Melbourne : Melbourne University Press; London; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1966-<2000>. Volume 14, pp.289-290.



Haire, Norman

(1892-1952) Medical practitioner and sexologist.
Studied medicine at the University of Sydney (M.B., Ch.M. 1915). A prolific author and active educator, he was a prominent reformer and researcher in Britain during the 1930s.

Reference: Australian dictionary of biography. Melbourne : Melbourne University Press; London ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1966-<2000>. Volume 14, pp.353-354.



Hall, Duncan

Born: 1891 Glen Innes, New South Wales
Died: 1976 Maryland, United States of America

Historian and public servant.

Quote from: Name record, Hall, Duncan. AustLit: Australian Literature Gateway (www.austlit.edu.au), 2002- [Retrieved 23/9/2004]



Harding, Traci

Traci Harding is an Australian novelist. She was born and raised in Sydney and has stated that her early interests included music and storytelling. After leaving school, she worked in a music store and later for film studios before picking up her former love of writing. Her first work, Ancient Future, was published in 1996 and she has been writing ever since. Her work combines fantasy, facts, esoteric beliefs, and history and quantum physics. At this point in time (2013), she has four trilogies in release and three stand-alone novels.
Works held in the manuscript collection include:

The Ancient Future trilogy (1996, 1997, 1998)
The Celestial Triad (2000, 2001, 2002)
Book of Dreams (2003)



Hart–Smith, William

Born: 23 Nov 1911 Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
Died: 15 Apr 1990 Auckland, New Zealand
Arrived in Australia: 1936
Departed from Australia: 1978

William Hart–Smith was born in England and moved with his parents to Auckland, New Zealand, in 1924. In 1936 he moved to Australia, living in Sydney, Hobart, Western Australia and Darwin and serving in the A.I.F.between 1942-1943. He returned to New Zealand in 1946, but moved back to Sydney in 1962 working as an advertising manager, then a radio technician.

From 1963-64 he was president of the Poetry Society of Australia. In 1970 he moved to Perth and taught creative writing at the Western Australia University of Technology (Curtin University). In 1978 he moved back to Auckland and lived there for the rest of his life.

Hart–Smith was heavily influenced by Ezra Pound, D. H. Lawrence and the Imagist movement. While in Tasmania in 1936, he developed an interest in Aboriginal myth. This led to his association with the Jindyworobak Movement, an association that saw his poems published regularly in Jindyworobak anthologies during the 1940s.

He published several volumes during the 1940s, most notably Christopher Columbus (1948). Hart–Smith's reputation continued to grow with subsequent publications and his poetry attracted a number of awards.

Recognized as both an Australian and New Zealand poet, Hart–Smith died in 1990. Hand to Hand: A Garnering, a collection of his published and unpublished poetry, was compiled in 1991 and includes a selection of essays on his life and work.

Quote from: Name record, Hart–Smith, William. AustLit: Australian Literature Gateway (www.austlit.edu.au), 2002- [Retrieved 23/9/2004]



Henry Lawson Literary Society

Publisher of the Lawsonian (1960-), a periodical which "focused on the life and writings of Henry Lawson. Also includes articles on other writers of his era."

Quote from: Name record, Henry Lawson Literary Society. AustLit: Australian Literature Gateway (www.austlit.edu.au), 2002- [Retrieved 23/9/2004]



Hetherington, Jack (John) Aikman

(1907-1974) Journalist and author.
A well regarded war correspondent whose war coverage included significant events such as the Anzac Corps' withdrawal from Greece and the D-Day landing at Normandy. He wrote one novel The Winds Are Still (1947); preferring biography Australians: Nine Profiles (1960), Forty-two Faces (1962), Australian Painters (1963) and Uncommon Men (1965).

This set of manuscripts consists of personal letters from John Hetherington to Norman Lindsay.

Reference: Australian dictionary of biography. Melbourne : Melbourne University Press; London; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1966-<2000>. Volume 14, pp.443-444.



Hogbin, Herbert Ian Priestley

(1904-1989) Anthropologist and sociologist.
Conducted fieldwork in Polynesia and New Guinea. He was instrumental in founding the Anthropology Department at both the University of Sydney, and later, at Macquarie University.

Reference: Encyclopedia of Anthropology. Edited by D.E. Hunter & P. Whitten. New York : Harper & Row, c1976.



Holland, Sir George William Frederick

(1897-1962)
Returned servicemen's leader. A committed lobbyist for the housing, health and welfare of returned soldiers and sailors.

Reference: Australian dictionary of biography. Melbourne : Melbourne University Press; London ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1966-<2000>. Volume 14, pp.465-466.



Holme, Ernest Rudolph

(1871-1952) Professor of English.
Holme had a long and valued association with the University of Sydney. His areas of academic interest included the English language and early English literature. He was instrumental in the restructure of the university union in 1912 and helped oversee the University's post-war expansion. His commitment to service and country was given expression through his active support of the University war memorials.

Reference: Australian dictionary of biography. Melbourne : Melbourne University Press; London ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1966-<2000>. Volume 9, pp.347-348.



Honiss, Lillian

The writer was in Russia during the Revolution. She later migrated to, and lectured in, Australia.



Howarth, Robert Guy

(1906-1974) Scholar, literary critic and poet.
His academic association with the University of Sydney began as a student (B.A., 1929), University of Oxford (B.Litt., 1931) and continuing as a lecturer from 1933-1955. He held considerable influence in literary publishing circles in the 1940s and 50s and contributed to the development of Australian literature. He accepted the Arderne chair of English literature at the University of Cape Town, 1955-1972.

He was a published poet, Spright and Geist (1944). His edited works include Minor Poets of the 17th Century (1931), Second Diary of Samuel Pepys (1932) and The Letters of Norman Lindsay (1979).

His library and manuscripts were acquired by the University of Texas, Austin, USA.

Reference: Australian dictionary of biography. Melbourne : Melbourne University Press; London ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1966-<2000>. Volume 14, pp.504-505.



Irvine, Ian

(1950- )
Ian Irvine was born in Bathurst and educated at Chevalier College and the University of Sydney, where he earned a Ph.D. in marine science in 1981. Setting up his own environmental consulting firm in 1986, Irvine has worked in many countries in the Asia-Pacific region. In the early 1980s he led several disastrous (his claim) expeditions to Sumatra, which gave him many ideas for his books. During the course of his career he played a role in developing Australia's national guidelines for protection of the oceanic environment and still works, albeit only occasionally, in this field. He began writing in 1987 what became the first title in his View from the Mirror quartet, but was not published for a decade. Since that time, he has become a fulltime writer for both young and adult readers with nearly thirty bestselling fantasy novels and futuristic eco-thrillers.

Works   in the manuscript collection include:
View from the Mirror quartet (1998, 1998, 1999, 1999)
Terminator Gene (2003)
The Life Lottery (2004)



Knight, Stephen Thomas

Also writes as: Street, Tom
Born: 21 Sep 1940 United Kingdom (UK)
Arrived in Australia: 1963
Departed from Australia: 1992

Stephen Knight was born on 21 September 1940 an educated at Bournemouth Grammar School and the University of Oxford. He was appointed Teaching Fellow at the University of Sydney in 1963 and lecturer in English in 1964. In 1968-69 he was lecturer in English at the Australian National University. He returned to the University of Sydney in 1970 where he was successively Senior Lecturer and Associate Professor. In 1987 he was appointed Robert Wallace Professor of English at the University of Melbourne. In 1992 Knight returned to England to take up a chair at the De Montfort University at Leicester. Most of Stephen Knight's scholarly writings have been in the area of medieval English literature. Knight has also had a long interest in crime fiction. Between 1989 and 1992 he edited four anthologies of Australian crime stories.

Quote from: Name record, Knight, Stephen. AustLit: Australian Literature Gateway (www.austlit.edu.au), 2002- [Retrieved 24/9/2004]



Lang, John Dunmore

(1799-1878) Presbyterian minister, politician, writer.
Lang migrated from Scotland to Australia in 1823. He established the Presbyterian Church in Australia and opened a Presbyterian school, the Australian College, which operated between 1831and 1854. Lang and the Presbyterian Synod had a volatile relationship throughout his life.

Passionate in his religious beliefs and supporter of assisted family immigration schemes, Lang actively encouraged British and Scottish immigration to Australia with the hope that public morality would benefit from the example of "well chosen" Protestant immigrants.

Lang also sought influence through writing and publishing books and journals, including An Historical and Statistical Account of New South Wales, both as a Penal Settlement and as a British Colony (1834) and The Colonial Observer (1841-1844).

He was elected to the Legislative Council for three terms and the Legislative Assembly (1859-69). He proved a loquacious participant and was goaled for four months during this period for publishing a criminal libel.

References: Australian dictionary of biography. Melbourne : Melbourne University Press; London ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1966-<2000>. Volume 2, pp.76-83;
Concise encyclopedia of Australia and New Zealand (revised). Sydney: Horwitz Grahame, 1989;
Elder, Bruce (ed) The A to Z of who is who in Australia's history? NSW: Child and Associates, 1987.



Larbalestier, Justine

Larbalestier was born and educated mainly in Sydney, although she spent a number of years in her youth in the Northern Territory, Newcastle and Canberra. She completed her Ph.D at the University of Sydney in 1996, using material from the Library’s science fiction collection for her research. The thesis, Battle of the Sexes in Science Fiction, was later published by Wesleyan University Press under the same title. Since that time, Larbalestier has become a writer of young adult fiction, with novels such as the Magic or Madness trilogy, How to Ditch your Fairy and Liar to her credit. She divides her time now between Sydney and New York.

Works in the manuscript collection include:

Battle of the Sexes in Science Fiction: from the pulps to the James Tiptree, Jr. memorial award (Ph.D, University of Sydney, 1996)

Battle of the Sexes in Science Fiction (2002)



Lawson, Henry

(1867-1922) Short story writer and poet.
Wrote quintessential stories and poems about Australia and Australians including Andy's Gone with Cattle (1888), The Drover's Wife (1892), Joe Wilson and His Mates (1901).

Reference: Australian dictionary of biography. Melbourne : Melbourne University Press; London ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1966-<2000>. Volume 10, pp.18-22.



Lawson, William

(1876-1957) Poet and author.
Worked as a journalist and was regularly published by the Bulletin and the Lone Hand. He wrote historical romances, including When Cobb and Co. was King (1936).

Reference: Australian dictionary of biography. Melbourne : Melbourne University Press; London ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1966-<2000>. Volume 10, pp.25.



Lindsay family

Lindsay, Percival Charles (1870-1952), Sir Lionel Arthur (1874-1961), Norman Alfred Williams (1879-1969), Ruby (1885-1818), and Sir Ernest Daryl (1889-1976)

Artists and writers. Talented and influential family whose creative work and bohemian lifestyles challenged the Australian public and prompted debate about the strictures of Australian society toward art and morality.

Reference: Australian dictionary of biography. Melbourne : Melbourne University Press; London ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1966-<2000>. Volume 10, pp.106-115.



Lindsay, Norman Alfred Williams

(1879-1969) Artist, author and bohemian.
He was much-loved for The Magic Pudding (1918) but considered highly controversial for his religious views, his artwork, notably 'Crucified Venus', and his writing, two novels being banned in Australia until the late 1950s. Lindsay had a long association with the Bulletin spanning over 50 years. By the 1960s he was viewed by some as an anachronism, however his contribution to Australian art and writing had been liberating.

Reference: Australian dictionary of biography. Melbourne : Melbourne University Press; London ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1966-<2000>. Volume 10, pp.106-115.



Lindsay, Rose

(1885-1978) Author and artist's model. Second wife of Norman Lindsay.

Reference: Wilde, William H., Hooton, Joy & Andrews, Barry The Oxford Companion to Australian Literature, 2nd ed. Melbourne, Oxford University Press, 1994.



McCrae, Hugh

(1876-1958) Prominent Australian poet, son of George McCrae.
First book Satyrs and Sunlight (1911) was illustrated by Norman Lindsay, as were Colombine (1920) and Idyllia (1922).

Quote from: EAD http://setis.library.usyd.edu.au/pubotbin/ead-browse?id=MS0007 [Retrieved 5/11/2004]



McGregor, Craig

Born: 12 Oct 1933 Jamberoo, New South Wales

Studied at the University of Sydney in the 1950s. Journalist and writer. Won the Xavier Society Prize, 1969 for Don't Talk to Me About Love.

References: Wilde, William H., Hooton, Joy & Andrews, Barry The Oxford Companion to Australian Literature, 2nd ed. Melbourne, Oxford University Press, 1994;
Name record, McGregor, Craig. AustLit: Australian Literature Gateway (www.austlit.edu.au), 2002- [Retrieved 28/10/2004]



MacKenzie, Kenneth

Born: 25 Sep 1913 Perth, Western Australia
Died: 19 Jan 1955 Goulburn, New South Wales

Kenneth Mackenzie was educated at Guildford Grammar School, and studied briefly at Muresk Agricultural College and the University of Western Australia.

He left Perth in December 1933 for Melbourne and then Sydney, on the advice of Norman Lindsay. In 1934, he married art teacher Kathleen Bartlett and they had two children. Mackenzie worked as a journalist with Smith's Weekly and ABC Weekly, before being drafted into the army in 1942. He served as a corporal in Cowra, overseeing Italian captives in a Prisoner of War camp, and later spent time in an army hospital. Mackenzie drew on his war experiences in his novel Dead Men Rising.

Mackenzie had several novels published, as well as short stories and collections of poetry, some of which appeared posthumously. He left behind unpublished manuscripts of short stories, radio plays and a novel. Mackenzie's fiction and poetry explores such themes as family relationships, the passage of time and life cycles, sexuality, and death. The Oxford Companion to Australian Literature asserts that his later poetry achieves 'a controlled tranquility and compassion'.

Quote from: Name record, MacKenzie, Kenneth. AustLit: Australian Literature Gateway (www.austlit.edu.au), 2002- [Retrieved 28/10/2004]



Macquarie Radio Theatre

(mid-1950s)
Producers: Lawrence H. Cecil, E. Mason Wood
Chief writer/adapter: Richard Lane
The Macquarie Radio Theatre was broadcast on the Macquarie network. The show acknowledged the craft of acting with annual radio awards.

Reference: Kent, Jacqueline Out of the bakelite box. Australia: Angus & Robertson, 1983.



McShane, Mark

Also writes as: Lovell, Marc
Born: 1929 Sydney, New South Wales

Quote from: Name record, McShane, Mark. AustLit: Australian Literature Gateway (www.austlit.edu.au), 2002- [Retrieved 28/10/2004]



Morrisby, Camden

Book collector, ex-libris collector and member of the NSW Bookplate Club and the Australian Ex Libris Society. Camden Morrisby was a close friend of Lionel Lindsay and corresponded with Australian literary and artistic figures.

Reference: Special Collections, Flinders University Library



Murphy, Arthur

(see Hart-Smith, William)

(1891-1963)
Engineer and airman. Distinguished career in aviation.

Reference: Australian dictionary of biography. Melbourne : Melbourne University Press; London ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1966-<2000>. Volume 10, pp.633.



NSW Bookstall Company

(1879-1946)
The NSW Bookstall Company was founded by Henry Lloyd in 1879. Alfred Cecil Rowlandson bought the business after Lloyd's death in 1897 and led the Company into an extremely successful foray of mass market paperback publishing. It published Australian popular fiction and postcards, operated bookshops, circulating libraries and a newsagency distribution. Sales figures illustrate the Company's success, between 1904 and 1922 it produced and sold 4-5 million books.

References: A history of the book in Australia 1891-1945. Edited by Martyn Lyons and John Arnold. Queensland: Queensland University Press, 2001;
Mills, Carol The New South Wales Bookstall Company as a publisher. Canberra: Mulini Press, 1991.



Osborn, Andrew D.

(1902-1977)
Osborn was an influential librarian at the Commonwealth Parliamentary Library in Melbourne, the New York Public Library, Harvard and the University of Sydney Library. He contributed academically from teaching posts at the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Western Ontario. In 1971 he started an antiquarian bookselling business.

Reference: Serials Librarian 6(3), Spring 1982. "Serials librarianship as an art: Essays in honor of Andrew D. Osborn"



Osmond, Warren

(1947-2000) Academic, Sydney Morning Herald journalist, editor of Campus Review.
Dr Osmond was interested in political science and Australia in the international sphere. He was the author of Frederic Eggleston: an intellectual in Australian politics. Sydney: George Allen & Unwin, 1985.

Reference: Maslen, Geoff 'He was up there with the best' [obituary] Campus Review October 18-24, 2000 pp10-11.



Pheils, Elmer

Correspondence between Elmer T. Pheils, an American osteopath practicing in London and George Bernard Shaw. They cover the period 1925 to Shaw's death in 1950.



Rabone, Harold

(1884-1944)
Harold Richard Rabone was a member of the Royal Australian Historical Society, the Society of Australian Genealogists and the Methodist Historical Society of NSW. Rabone spent considerable time on Lord Howe and Norfolk Islands and Tonga. His father and grandfather had been missionaries in Tonga. His interests also included Pitcairn and Norfolk Islands. He published Lord Howe Island: Its discovery and early associations 1788-1888. Sydney: Australis, 1940.

Reference: Stephen, Alfred E. "Obituary - Harold Richard Rabone" Royal Australian Historical Society Journal, 30.6 (1944): 458-459.



Rabone, Harold

(1884-1944)
Harold Richard Rabone was a member of the Royal Australian Historical Society, the Society of Australian Genealogists and the Methodist Historical Society of NSW. Rabone spent considerable time on Lord Howe and Norfolk Islands and Tonga. His father and grandfather had been missionaries in Tonga. His interests also included Pitcairn and Norfolk Islands. He published Lord Howe Island: Its discovery and early associations 1788-1888. Sydney: Australis, 1940.

Reference: Stephen, Alfred E. "Obituary - Harold Richard Rabone" Royal Australian Historical Society Journal, 30.6 (1944): 458-459.



Stewart, Douglas

Born New Zealand 1913-1985. Editor of and literary editor of Angus and Robertson until 1971. Writer and critic. Plays include Fisher's Ghost, represented in mss. form in this collection.

Quote from: EAD http://setis.library.usyd.edu.au/pubotbin/ead-browse?id=MS0010 [Retrieved 5/11/04]



Stewart, G.N.

Gordon Neil Stewart (1912- ) Australian writer and technical journalist. Edited Australian stories of horror & suspense from the early days.

The Rare Book Library collection of the Stewart family papers includes letters of Major General William Stewart (1769-1854).



Stivens, Dal

Dal Stivens was born in Blayney, NSW, in 1911. He served in the Army Education Service during World War II and, after the war, he worked for the Department of Information and later at Australia House in London. He was the foundation president of the Australian Society of Authors in 1963. Dal's work was first published in the Bulletin in the late 1930s. A Horse of Air won the Miles Franklin Award in 1970. In 1981 he received the Patrick White Award for contributions to Australian literature. He died in 1997.

Quote from: Sydney University Press publication notes



Stone, Walter

Born: 24 Jun 1910 Orange, New South Wales
Died: 29 Aug 1981 Sydney, New South Wales

Walter Stone spent the first fourteen years of his life in Orange, New South Wales, before moving to Sydney where his father pursued a declining career as a bookmaker. After completing his education at the Parramatta Boys High School, he was articled to a solicitor, but after the solicitor's death he held a number of depression-era jobs such as rent collector and door-to-door salesman. Partial deafness kept him out of the military during the Second World War. He worked as a clerk for General Electric and continued that occupation with another company after the war until 1956.

Stone, a bibliophile from an early age, was a founding member of the Book Collectors' Society of Australia, editing and printing the organ of the society, Biblionews, for the rest of his life. Acting on his interest in book production, he bought his first press in 1951. During the next decade he produced a number of works, including Dulcie Deamer's poem 'Blue Centaur', P. R. Stephensen's Kookaburra's and Satyrs (1954) and R. D. FitzGerald's poem of a convict-flogging, 'The Wind at Your Door' (1959). These titles established him as a fine printer and led to more than 100 such publications by 1981. He also printed and was general editor of the series Studies in Australian Bibliography (1954-1978) which recorded the publications of such writers as Henry Lawson, Joseph Furphy, John Shaw Neilson, Rolf Boldrewood, Christopher Brennan, Hugh McCrae, Marcus Clarke and several members of the Lindsay family.

Stone was an influential member of many organisations, including the Australian Society of Authors, the National Book Council and the Christopher Brennan Society. He actively campaigned with others for a Chair in Australian literature at the University of Sydney. A member of the Sydney Branch of the English Association, Stone edited the journal Southerly for one year in 1961 and printed the magazine at his Wentworth Press from 1962. He was also friend to many libraries, including the University of Sydney, La Trobe, the State Library of Victoria and the Fryer Library at the University of Queensland. For the latter, he was instrumental in acquiring the important Hayes Collection of Australian literature.

Walter Stone's contribution to Australian literature was recognised with an OAM in June 1981. Suffering from a long illness, he died two months later.

Awards:
Order of Australia, Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM), 1981
NBC Bookman of the Year Award, 1975

Quote from: Name record, Stone, Walter. AustLit: Australian Literature Gateway (www.austlit.edu.au), 2002- [Retrieved 29/10/2004]



Thompson, John

(1907-1968)
John Thompson was born and educated in Melbourne, graduating with an arts degree from the University of Melbourne. After spending several years in England during the 1930s, he settled in Perth and joined the ABC as a broadcaster. He served in the military during World War II and continued his broadcasting career after the war. He was a correspondent for the Asian region, particularly Indonesia, and also worked for the BBC in London and South Africa. Thompson also produced many widely-admired radio documentaries and biographies.

Thompson's first book of poetry was Three Dawns Ago (1935). In total, he published four collections. His third volume, Thirty Poems (1954), won the Grace Leven Poetry Prize. Thompson conducted a series of interviews of Australian poets for Southerly and edited several anthologies, including The Penguin Book of Australian Verse (1958) with Kenneth Slessor and R. G. Howarth.

Thompson became a well-known figure in Paddington, Sydney, after campaigning against the construction of an expressway through the suburb. He died in 1968 after several operations. His funeral was attended by many people from Paddington, artists, writers, radio people and academics.

Awards:
Grace Leven Poetry Prize, 1954: winner for Thirty Poems

Quote from: Name record, Thompson, John. AustLit: Australian Literature Gateway (www.austlit.edu.au), 2002- [Retrieved 29/10/2004]



Wedgewood, Camilla

(1901-1955) Social anthropologist.
Conducted fieldwork on the island of Manam, New Guinea where she studied the lives of the women and children. Dr Wedgewood lectured at the University of Sydney and was Principal of the Women's College between 1935 and 1944. After the war she taught at the School of Pacific Administration. In this position she was able to promote the education of girls and women on the islands of Oceania.

Reference: Women Anthropologists: A biographical dictionary. Edited by Ute Gacs et al.1988.



Whitecross, Roy

Roy Hamilton Whitecross served as a private in the Australian Imperial Force during World War 2. He was a prisoner-of-war in Malaya, Burma, Thailand, Indochina and Japan. During his incarceration he worked on the Burma-Thailand Railway. After the war, Whitecross obtained an economics degree from the University of Sydney. He worked at the University from 1963 to 1978.

Reference: Whitecross, Roy Slaves of the Son of Heaven : a personal account of an Australian POW, 1942-1945. Melbourne, 1953; NSW: Kangaroo Press, 2000.



Wilkes, G.A.

Born: 27 Sep 1927 Punchbowl, New South Wales

Gerald Alfred Wilkes studied at the University of Sydney. His interest in Australian literature saw him take the unconventional step, in the 1940s and 1950s, of writing BA and MA theses on Australian writers: Henry Handel Richardson and Christopher Brennan, respectively. His MA thesis on Brennan's Poems (1913) was published as a monograph in 1953 and remains a highly respected study. Wilkes published a significant amount of articles on Brennan, but he extended his analyses to many other Australian writers, including A. D. Hope, Patrick White, R. D. Fitzgerald and Judith Wright. Many of these articles drew on the lectures he had developed during the 1960s as foundation professor of Australian literature at the University of Sydney. In addition, his contributions to and his thirty-four year editorship of Southerly drew his attention further into the history of Australian literature. Many studies on the development of Australian literature in the nineteenth century appeared during the 1970s and 1980s, culminating in The Stockyard and the Croquet Lawn: Literary Evidence for Australian Cultural Development (1981). Wilkes argued against restricting Australian nationalism to the ten year period of the 1890s, stimulating much research into the development of nineteenth century Australian culture.

Quote from: Name record, Wilkes, G.A.. AustLit: Australian Literature Gateway (www.austlit.edu.au), 2002- [Retrieved 29/10/2004]



Wright, David McKee

(1869-1928) Poet and journalist.
Born in Ireland, Wright emigrated to New Zealand when he was 18 years old. His stories and verse about station life were published regularly. Wright was a Congregational minister for some years before turning to writing fulltime in 1905. His writing often dealt with social and political issues. He moved to Australia in 1910 and contributed to the Bulletin, the Sun and the (Australian) Worker. He counted Christopher Brennan and Henry Lawson among his friends and was the partner of Zora Cross for the last decade of his life.

Reference: Australian dictionary of biography. Melbourne : Melbourne University Press; London ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1966-<2000>. Volume 12 pp.584.



Zani De Ferranti, Marco Aurelio

(1801 - 1878)
"Italian guitar virtuoso, composer and man of letters. His passion for music was first inspired by hearing Paganini. At the age of 12 he began learning the violin, and by 16 he was accomplished; yet he abandoned the violin for the guitar. In 1820 he gave his first guitar concert, almost unnoticed, in Paris, a city then under the sway of Carcassi and Carulli, more experienced masters of the instrument. The rivalry among guitarists in Paris evidently hastened his departure for St Petersburg; he stayed in Russia as a secretary to various royal households (c1820-24) and then moved to Hamburg. He gave successful guitar concerts there (1825) and in Brussels, Paris and London (1826-7). In 1827 he settled in Brussels, where he laboriously perfected, in his words, the art of 'sustaining notes on the guitar'. In 1832 he made his improved technique public, with considerable acclaim, in Brussels, then in Holland, England and France. Paganini declared him to be superior to other guitarists he had heard in Europe. He toured the USA in 1846 with the violinist Ernesto Sivori, and returned to Brussels to take up an appointment at the conservatory as professor of Italian. In 1855 he returned to Italy. He left about 24 compositions for guitar, including fantasias (opp.1, 4, 5, 7, 10), rondos, caprices, divertissements and nocturnes."
Thomas F. Heck

Reference: The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians; edited by Stanley Sadie. London : Macmillan Publishers ; Washington, D.C. : Grove's Dictionaries of Music, 1980, 1995. Volume 20, p.642.



Zeitler, Adolphus / Hagen, N.

N. Hagen of Noumea
Adolphus Zeitler of Ringdove Bay, Epi
(Period covered by correspondence 1904-1922)