Hippocrates to Harrison : Galen Epitome


HIPPOCRATES TO HARRISON


Introduction
Classical Works
Anaesthesia
Surgery
Anatomy
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Internal Medicine
Pathology
Infection and Immunity
Neurology and Psychiatry
Public Health
Tropical Medicine
Therapeutics
Evolution and Genetics
Physiology
Authors A to Z
Who was Harrison?
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Classical works

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Galenus, Cladius
Epitome Galeni operum, in quatuor partes digesta, pulcherrima methodo universam viri doctrinam complectens; cum compendio ipiusmet Galeni in Hippocratem in calce hujus libri adjecto, auctore A. Lucuna; edition novissima multis mendi expurgate.
Lugdini : sumpt. Joan, Caffin & Francisc. Plaighard, 1643.

Image from Galen Epitome

Galen's enormous output of medical writings abounded with descriptive detail and observation which could be verified directly from nature. For close on a millennium Galen had been regarded as infallible, a position endorsed by the mediaeval Church, but his findings were repeatedly challenged by anatomists and physiologists of the Renaissance. Vesalius and Harvey avoided the censure of the Church but others like Servetus were burned at the stake or imprisoned for lengthy periods by the Church authorities. Many of Galen's remedies (Galenicals) remained in the Pharmacopoeia until modern times.

RB 6143.2