Hippocrates to Harrison : Pasteur


HIPPOCRATES TO HARRISON


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Infection and Immunity

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Pasteur, Louis, 1822-1895
Études sur la bière : ses maladies, causes qui les provoquent, procédé pour la rendre inaltérable; avec une theorie nouvelle de la fermentation.
Paris : Gauthier-Villars, 1876.

Image from Pasteur Études

In Études sur la Bière Pasteur describes practical technology used to avoid spoilage during the manufacture of beer. The book is significant because it also explains his fundamental discoveries about the biological basis of fermentation, anaerobic growth of organisms and the impossibility of spontaneous generation. It reports the ideas and experiments which he developed during his time at the University of Strasbourg in the 1850s. Partly because of political uncertainties related to the Franco-Prussian war it was not published until 1871, several years after its companion volume, Études sur le Vin (1863). By then Pasteur had turned his attention to infectious diseases of humans and domestic animals.

Moore Collection
RB Moore P3