Hippocrates to Harrison : Willis


HIPPOCRATES TO HARRISON


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Anatomy

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Willis, Thomas, 1621-1675
De anima brutorum quae hominis vitalis ac sentitiva est : exercitationes duae / studio Thomae Willis M.D. Publisher
Londini : Typis E.F. impensis Ric. Davis, Oxon, 1672.

Image from Willis Anima

As a student at Oxford, Thomas Willis joined the Royalist garrison during the Civil War. He gained professional preferment with the Restoration, becoming Professor of Natural Philosophy at Oxford in 1660. He was one of the founder members of the Royal Society and moved to London just after the Great Fire, establishing a very large practice in St Martin's Lane. This success was in part due to his connections with both the Court and the Church. Willis wrote an important treatise on neuro-anatomy, describing his eponymous circle, which was illustrated by Sir Christopher Wren. He also wrote the work on psychiatry on display here, The Soul of Brutes, Which is that of the Vital and Sensitive of Man. Personally he was much respected because of his philanthropy and his elegant Latin style was widely admired and imitated.

RB Wing W2826Vi